Faceted Taxonomy Resources

/, Taxonomy/Faceted Taxonomy Resources

Recently I wrote a paper on faceted classification (also known as faceted taxonomy). This paper focused on how to create a faceted taxonomy – not on how to search in a faceted taxonomy. Some of these resources are available for free on the web, so I thought I’d include them here for you:

Berners-Lee, T. (1998). What the semantic web can represent. Retrieved October 9, 2010, from http://www.w3.org/DesignIssues/RDFnot.html

Denton, W. (2009). How to make a faceted classification and put it on the web. Retrieved October 9, 2010, from http://www.miskatonic.org/library/facet-web-howto.html

Getty Trust. (2010). About the AAT. Retrieved October 11, 2010, from http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/aat/about.html

Getty Trust. (2010). Art & architecture thesaurus online. Retrieved October 11, 2010, from http://www.getty.edu/research/conducting_research/vocabularies/aat/

Louie, A., Washington, W., & Maddox, E. (2003, March). Using faceted classification to provide structure for information architecture. Paper presented at the Information Architecture Summit 2003, Portland, OR. Retrieved September 20, 2010, from http://depts.washington.edu/pettt/presentations/conf_2003/IASummit.pdf

National Information Standards Organization. (2005). ANSI/NISO Z39.19: Guidelines for the construction, format, and management of monolingual thesauri. Retrieved September 12, 2010, from http://www.niso.org/kst/reports/standards/

Spiteri, L. (1998). A simplified model for facet analysis: Ranganathan 101. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science 23(1/2), 1-30. http://iainstitute.org/en/learn/research/a_simplified_model_for_facet_analysis.php

W3C. SKOS. Retrieved October 11, 2010 from http://www.w3.org/2004/02/skos/

If you can get your hands on it, Toni Peterson wrote an article called Developing a New Thesaurus for Art and Architecture in Library Trends, 1990. It’s an incredible look at how they built a huge faceted classification scheme.

By | 2012-05-01T14:37:41+00:00 November 16th, 2010|Categories: Information Architecture, Taxonomy|Tags: , |5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. […] everywhere. NextSpace, 15: 4-9. Morville, P. (2005) Ambient findability. Sebastopol: O’Reilly. Faceted Taxonomy Resources blog […]

  2. F.J. Devadason November 3, 2011 at 7:57 am

    The best way to learn “how to design a faceted classification” is to read Ranganathan’s works and construct one faceted classification. All the articles and books on this subject starting from Vickery in UK and everyone else is a copy of his works and ideas.
    Several articles on design of depth version of colon classification have been published in the journal “Library Science with a slant to documentation” from the1960’s . If you follow the methodology given in those articles, you will know . Of course the depth versions are too deep to be of any practical use. However subject indexing systems based on facet analysis are very useful in the web environment.

  3. F.J. Devadason November 3, 2011 at 8:00 am

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    The best way to learn “how to design a faceted classification” is to read Ranganathan’s works and construct one faceted classification. All the articles and books on this subject starting from Vickery in UK and everyone else is a copy of his works and ideas.
    Several articles on design of depth version of colon classification have been published in the journal “Library Science with a slant to documentation” from the1960′s . If you follow the methodology given in those articles, you will know . Of course the depth versions are too deep to be of any practical use. However subject indexing systems based on facet analysis are very useful in the web environment.

  4. Theresa Putkey November 3, 2011 at 8:24 am

    Interesting comment, F.J. In Spiteri’s article, she says Ranganathan is too complex for the average student to understand. I would also argue that many people don’t want to create a faceted classification, but a faceted taxonomy (which is less complex than a classification w/o enumeration). As always, thanks for the comment. And you’re right, I left out the reference to Ranganathan!
    Spiteri, L. (1998). A simplified model for facet analysis: Ranganathan 101. Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science 23(1/2), 1-30. http://iainstitute.org/en/learn/research/a_simplified_model_for_facet_analysis.php

  5. […] on a taxonomy. If you take Epicurious.com, they have an infinite number of pages driven from their faceted classification. In this case, a site map cannot express the structure of the site. The wireframes must hold all […]

Comments are closed.